An independent digital studio designed to bring strategy, creativity and technology together to create award winning interactive experiences and content for brands.

BRAND

adidas by Stella McCartney

PROJECT

Nature x City VR

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BRAND

adidas by Stella McCartney

PROJECT

Nature x City VR

Presenting the FW17 collection from a unique perspective

Challenge

The new adidas by Stella McCartney FW17 collection is inspired by the contrasting environments of city life and the wild outdoors. The designs exemplify that in their nature-inspired prints, their detailing and the different technologies used to ensure that those wearing them are ready for anything.

Clubhouse were tasked with launching the collection and it’s key looks, during a private launch event to key media and influencers within the fashion world.

Idea

In the spirit of the collection’s ability to adapt to the wearer’s environment and training pattern, we created an interactive experience that goes beyond a simple product presentation. VR headsets fully immerse the viewer at the heart of a 360° performance; bringing the story and the collection’s versatility to life in a truly unique way.

Viewers were placed at the centre of two parallel worlds in which the new collection excels; One, a rooftop overlooking the busy urban cityscape below – the other, a rural terrain where nature takes centre stage. The contrasting city and nature locations reflected the versatility of the collection, as well as the different ways the versatile female athlete can wear the clothes.

Within each world, female athletes including Japanese influencers Yuka Mannami and Chiharu Okunugi were positioned around the viewer performing their own continuous movements inspired by training. By interacting with the provided remote, each viewer can create a film experience that’s completely unique to them; controlling what they see and when within a dual-environment that surrounds them 360°.

The interactive film is was showcased using the Google’s DayDream VR headset and their latest Pixel handset.

Results

Over 600 guests from media and the fashion world experienced the VR collection launch from their own perspective at the Tokyo event.

“With the new FW17 collection, every design has been considered so women can be creative and thrive whatever their environment, their workout, or what the weather is like. With this playful virtual reality experience we’ve not only communicate this, but it’s done so in such a fun and innovative way”
– Stella McCartney

BRAND

Hoxton Mini Press

PROJECT

86½ years

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BRAND

Hoxton Mini Press

PROJECT

86½ years

A good photographic portrait always captures two people...

Challenge

‘I’ve lived in London for 86½ years’ was published by Hoxton Mini Press in 2014, where it quickly became a local cult classic. The first photography book to be published by the company documented the 3 year friendship between it’s founder and photographer Martin Usborne, and Joseph Markovitch, an East London pensioner who’d lived in the area for his whole life, and who’d seen the city transform around him.

Joseph sadly passed away in 2013, and on the year that he would’ve turned 90 years old, Hoxton Mini Press recognised an opportunity to celebrate the relationship he and Martin shared, and pay homage to the man behind the imaginative words and quirky portraits that had captured the hearts of so many.

Idea

“An element of my own loneliness exists in the photos of Joseph. A good photographic portrait always captures two people: the subject & the person taking the picture.”

Martin Usborne

We set out to create an experience that captured the purity and authenticity of the original book; brought to life in a new and immersive way that would allow Joseph’s story to reach a much wider audience.

As a natural successor to the heartbreakingly beautiful photography book, 86½ years follows a unique dual narrative; inviting you to step into the world that Joseph & Martin both shared, by experiencing it through both of their eyes.

Each chapter is split into two parts, and navigated intuitively with eye-tracking technology quietly working in the background to enhance the narrative. The simple closing of the eyes is all that’s needed to step fully into the world of Joe’s imagination. Once closed and with the distractions of life removed, Joe begins to share this thoughts and feelings from an eclectic mix of topics ranging from money, to relationships and the Universe.

As Joe finishes, the opening of your eyes reveals the original still photograph Martin took to accompany joe’s words; brought to life for the first time through moving image, alongside the photographer’s memories of the day and the time they spent together.

As a final enhancement to accompany the words and photography, foley recordings were captured at each of the locations where the original photographs were taken, completing a full-sensory digital experience that honours the authenticity and spirit of the original journal.

Results

Every single element of the experience was designed, written, built, recorded, shot and composed in East London, where Joseph was born, raised and lived his whole life. As an East London studio alongside Hoxton Mini Press, it was important that the project honoured the authenticity of the original story, and Joseph’s clear love for the area and the people within it.

The dual-narrative offered a perspective the original book couldn’t provide. Martin’s notes offer a human insight into the character of Joseph, the moments he shared with him, and how it impacted both of their lives, until Joseph sadly passed away.

From concept through to release the project took Clubhouse 11 weeks to complete, but it’s a story that’s been 90 years in the making…

BRAND

Clubhouse Studios

PROJECT

The Happy Forecast

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BRAND

Clubhouse Studios

PROJECT

The Happy Forecast

A social happiness experiment in London

Challenge

Sharing the same space for just a few minutes a day with kind and friendly strangers has been shown to make us more optimistic, improve our self-esteem, and feel safer within our environment.

When we give to others or act cooperatively, the reward centres of our own brain light up in acknowledgement, but strangers aren’t always inclined to be friendly to each other, and researchers now believe our shared spaces are becoming less friendly over time; particularly in built-up communities and areas like London.

Idea

Considerations for Londoners when looking for areas to live are fairly black and white. Average house prices, proximity to amenities, travel links and resale values are all high-priority concerns when settling on a location, but what these don’t tell you is how happy you’re likely to be within your chosen community during the time you live there.

With a population of 8million+ and one of the largest metropolitan environments in the world, we wanted to give Londoners’ an indication as to which areas of their city are best to live in for social wellbeing and long-term happiness. Would the millionaires on Bishop’s Avenue in Hampstead be better neighbours than the house-sharers of Hackney? Did Brixton’s community reputation ring true for those regularly moving through it’s public spaces?

We approached Professor Dacher Keltner; Social Psychologist at The University of California, Berkeley (and ‘Emotions Consultant’ for Pixar’s film tackling social wellbeing, ‘Inside Out’). He uses a technique called the ‘Jen Ratio’ as a way of gauging the social wellbeing of any shared environment. The higher the ratio the better the social well-being of the space, and the happier you’re likely to feel after spending time in it. It’s a simple yet powerful way to predict whether a particular space will contribute to your overall happiness in the long term.

In the first social experiment of it’s kind, we took the Jen Ratio for a test drive in a large-scale, city-wide social study; brought to life in an immersive interactive experience. The Happy Forecast is a webGL-powered interactive map of London that ranks each parent postcode by the positivity of the communities that inhabit them, after 700 hours of community observation throughout all 119 borough postcodes.

The site brings ‘raw’ scientific data of the Jen Ratio to life using a familiar visual for Londoners – the weather forecast. Happier postcodes feature sunny and bright 3D models such as fruit trees, flowers and clear blue skies, whilst the less happy areas use lighting clouds, sparse trees and dark skies.

Press & Publications
Results

People engaged. Over 600,000 page views with no paid media support were registered from visitors interacting with the site, on average, for well over 3 minutes each.

Within the press, a total of 38 pieces of coverage were earned during launch week alone. The site featured, along with a 3 minute interview, on the ITV National News at 6pm, 7pm and 10pm. In addition to numerous awards, we received high quality coverage on outlets including BBC, ITV online, City A.M, The Huffington Post, The Evening Standard, Shortlist, The Mirror and TimeOut.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the project did spark the positivity and awareness we wanted. Social wellbeing along with how we behave towards our fellow Londoners were both well and truly part of active conversations, and for the areas that received poor forecasts, Londoners rallied, with spin-off campaigns of positivity being generated organically.

“In my many years of being in this game of happiness, this is some of the most innovative work I’ve encountered.”

– Prof. Dacher Keltner – University of Berkeley
BRAND

Dishoom

PROJECT

Dishoom.com

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BRAND

Dishoom

PROJECT

Dishoom.com

Bringing the taste of Bombay to the every day

Challenge

Dishoom were preparing to open their third site in King’s Cross, when we were welcomed into the fold and asked to overhaul their digital presence.

The ambition was to recreate Dishoom’s “world” – “an innocent, big-hearted, slightly barmy, sepia-tinted, charmed kind of place”, in which they welcome anyone and everyone; transporting them to a more romantic time and place by curating and sharing their love for Bombay’s food and culture. This “world” has four principles at its core. Seva, selfless service to others. Nostalgia, paying affectionate homage to the Bombay of the first half of the last century. Honesty, being true to who and what Dishoom is; no nonsense. And Barmy-ness, delighting in playful and eccentric quirks.

This vision of Dishoom’s “world” and these core principles provided a solid foundation and constant reference point for us, helping them to create an online experience that is (almost!) as rich and rewarding as visiting one of the cafés themselves.

This approach was carried through the entire process in the creation of a new class of CMS-driven restaurant websites. One that subtly shares the romantic story of Dishoom whilst, in the spirit of Seva, quickly provides visitors with the information they are seeking.

Links
Idea

Bringing a taste of Bombay to the everyday.

A functional and editorially lead website that transports visitors to Dishoom’s nostalgic vision of Bombay in the 1930s – 1960s. An experience that honours Dishoom’s Dharma; selflessness, honesty and eccentricity.

Each page of the website has been crafted like a piece of print design – the only authentic reference point for the 1930-60’s Bombay design aesthetic. The bespoke responsive framework optimises to the viewers browser and device to best showcase the crafted content and design aesthetic. This allowed us to achieve our internal ambition, that ’every page could be framed and hung on the wall’

Results

The site’s aesthetic and smooth navigation led to numerous positive press and awards for the brand. In addition to this, and in the spirit of the Bombay term ‘Seva’ – the act of selfless service – the site helped visitors not only discover a taste of Bombay, but also improved efficiency for those wanting to book a table. Since the new design went live the brand saw 106% increase in repeat visitors, a 50% uplift in dwell time, and perhaps most impressively, a 1000% increase in successful bookings originating from the site.